Patella Instability – Surgery?

Patella Instability: When Should Surgery Be Considered?by Seth Sherman, MD Patella dislocation is the second most common cause of traumatic knee injury behind an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The patella or “kneecap” may dislocate (i.e., pop out of place) during sports participation. This may be the result of a contact/collision or a non-contact injury…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Return to Play after ACL surgery

Return to Play After ACL Reconstructionby Arun Ramappa, MD Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common knee injuries sustained by athletes.1 Hearing news of this injury is often overwhelming for athletes as they know they will have to put their recreational or competitive careers on hold to allow for…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

New Treatment for ACL Repair?

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an important stabilizingligament in the knee joint that is commonly injured in athletes. Repair of the ACL has been attempted in the past with mixed results, primarily because this ligament does not always reliably heal. Since then, the orthopaedic community transitioned to reconstructing the ligament with a tendon graft…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

Meet the Remarkable DMARD

Decades ago, many medications available today that successfully treat various kinds of inflammatory arthritis didn’t exist. But, if you’ve recently been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis your physician can choose from many different DMARDs—disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. These drugs actually target inflammation-causing reactions in your immune system to modify the disease…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

The Best Treatment for Claudication—Keep Walking

If, while walking, you feel intermittent pain that subsides when you stop, don’t automatically assume it results from aging or arthritis. The pain may be claudication, which is a symptom of peripheral arterial disease. While peripheral arterial disease is a serious condition that needs to be treated by your physician, the good news is that…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

Kick the Pain of Gout

In this age of gyms on every corner and fitness-focused reality television shows and entire networks, it’s easy to think of a high-impact workout as a panacea for all kinds of physical ailments. But the truth of the matter is far more complex. For people suffering from gout, choosing which exercises to do and when…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

Taking Raynaud Out of Circulation

For most people, getting things out of the refrigerator is a simple task. For those with Raynaud disease, however, it can be a misery. Who wants fingers that turn blue and go numb while putting cream in a cup of coffee? While not a life-threatening condition, Raynaud disease can be deeply uncomfortable, embarrassing and limiting….

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

A Casting Call for My Sprained Wrist

Many of us would breathe a sigh of relief if we heard that our wrist was only sprained instead of broken, and would look forward to a less arduous and painful treatment process. So we might be shocked to discover that we would still need to wear a cast that will immobilize our forearm for…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

Get a Leg Up on Iliotibial Band Syndrome

The iliotibial band is a very long, dense band of fibrous tissue running from the hip to the knee. Irritation of this band, common among runners and cyclists, is known as iliotibial band syndrome, or ITBS. There’s a curious aspect to ITBS: While it can cause significant pain on the outside of the knee, the…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

Exercises That Keep Incontinence at Bay

Walk into any fitness center or physical therapy practice, and you probably won’t see anyone doing pelvic floor exercises to help manage urinary incontinence. But that doesn’t mean it’s not happening. First, you can’t tell that someone is doing pelvic floor exercises; the exerciser seems to be at rest. Second, and more important, pelvic floor…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest