Mending Your Torn Meniscus

Mending Your Torn Meniscus The menisci are cartilages in the knee that protect the joint from stresses of activity. Pivoting actions that cause the knee to twist pose a risk for meniscus tears. The injury is common among tennis players, but it can also result from deep knee bending, squatting or lifting a heavy object….

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Tennis Elbow: To Brace or Not to Brace?

Tennis Elbow: To Brace or Not to Brace? Most people diagnosed with “tennis elbow,” technically called lateral epicondylosis, probably did not develop this problem by playing tennis—although, of course, tennis players are frequent sufferers. The lateral epicondyle is the bony area on the outside of the elbow, and the “–osis” refers to tiny tears in the…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Loosen Up a Stiff Neck

Loosen Up a Stiff Neck Neck pain is a very common complaint. But the good news is that it is usually caused by joint and muscle problems, not serious disease. A variety of physical therapy treatments can lessen neck pain. Mobilization is a rehabilitation technique in which our hands slowly and repeatedly move the neck joints…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Is Anterior Superior? Hip Replacement Options

Is Anterior Superior? Hip Replacement Options Patients may find recovery from a total hip replacement (THR) performed with the newer anterior (front) approach easier than that performed with the traditional posterior (back) approach. To reach your hip joint, the surgeon makes an incision in the front of your leg and separates muscles, rather than cutting…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Bumping Up Treatment for Ganglion Cysts

Bumping Up Treatment for Ganglion Cysts Do you have a bump on the wrist your physician called a ganglion cyst? These soft-tissue fluid-filled lumps are usually harmless, generally painless and often go away on their own. Ganglions can occur in any joint and may result from arthritis or from injury due to repetitive stress activities. If the cyst is painful, interferes…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Knife-free Relief for Knee Arthritis

Knife-free Relief for Knee Arthritis  More than a million surgeries are performed every year to help people suffering from arthritis of the knee. While such surgery is sometimes the best option, two studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine, one in 2002 and one in 2008, found that physical therapy and medications can be just…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

ACL Repair: Your Tissue or Someone Else’s?

ACL Repair: Your Tissue or Someone Else’s? If you have torn your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), the main ligament that stabilizes the knee, and are scheduled for reconstructive surgery to repair it, your surgeon could use either an autograft or an allograft. What is the difference between the two? An autograft is a piece of…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

When Your Shoulder Blade Is “SICK”

When Your Shoulder Blade Is “SICK” Do you have a “SICK” scapula? No, not sick with a fever or a cold, but SICK—an abnormal condition of the shoulder blade. This condition is characterized by Scapular malposition: The scapula has moved to an abnormal position on the rib cage. Inferior medial border prominence: The scapula protrudes abnormally…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

The Broken Bone You Never Knew You Had

The Broken Bone You Never Knew You Had Considering that most patients with osteochondritis dissecans are adolescent boys, the explanation of the condition is sure to win points for sheer gross-out potential. Characterized by pain, limited range of motion, and a popping or locking sound in the joint, osteochondritis dissecans occurs when a small piece of cartilage breaks…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

TENS Ways to Alleviate Pain

TENS Ways to Alleviate Pain One approach used in a rehabilitation program, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) uses an electric current to stimulate muscles to contract. Electrical impulses are thought to interrupt messages sent by pain receptors from the nerves to the brain. If the brain does not receive these messages, it does not recognize…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest