The Vicious Cycle of Tibial Tendonitis

The Vicious Cycle of Tibial Tendonitis Attaching your calf muscle to the bones on the inside of your foot, the posterior tibial tendon is one of the most common—and most irritating—locations to develop tendonitis. Tendonitis occurs when a tendon gets inflamed or partially torn from overuse or injury. When this happens in the posterior tibial tendon,…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Regain Your Knee and Gain the Pounds?

Regain Your Knee and Gain the Pounds? It sounds counterintuitive. You have surgery that makes it easier to be active and mobile, and then you begin to gain weight. But that is exactly what recent studies have suggested: Patients who have knee replacement surgeries have a 60% chance of gaining 5% or more of their…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Brace Yourself for More Ankle Bracing Questions

Brace Yourself for More Ankle Bracing Questions Ankle sprains are the most common sports-related injury, so athletes and coaches have a high degree of interest in preventing them. In addition, almost three-quarters of athletes with ankle sprains reinjure their ankle. Multiple recurring sprains can lead to chronic ankle instability and end an athletic career. If…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

The Hot and Cold of Physical Therapy

The Hot and Cold of Physical Therapy Heat applied before exercise or treatment and ice applied afterward are standard physical therapy interventions. Why? Because heat maximizes the benefits while cold minimizes any microdamage from physical therapy. Heat expands the blood vessels in the area to which it is applied. As the blood vessels expand, more…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Dive Back in After Swimmer’s Shoulder

Dive Back in After Swimmer’s Shoulder Are you an avid swimmer now sidelined by swimmer’s shoulder? You have plenty of company. Swimmer’s shoulder can develop from overuse, a change in your stroke or an increase in the intensity or duration of your swimming activity. Swimmers tend to have above-average flexibility and range of motion in…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Early Exercise = Speedy Healing Following Disc Surgery

Early Exercise = Speedy Healing Following Disc Surgery If you have had a microdiscectomy—surgery to alleviate sciatica, or sciatic nerve pain caused by a herniated disc—a postoperative regimen that includes exercise can help speed your return to a normal, active life. In the past, patients were advised to limit their movements for up to six…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Step Up to Therapy After a Meniscus Tear

Step Up to Therapy After a Meniscus Tear The menisci, two semicircular pieces of knee cartilage located where the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone) meet, help diffuse the forces on the knee and act as shock absorbers. Meniscal tears are common. Young athletes often tear a meniscus when twisting with the knee flexed…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Medial Collateral Ligament ~ PT eDigest

Recovering from a Torn Medial Collateral Ligament  No one wants a knee injury, of course, but if you have one, a torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) is one of the least serious. This is because MCLs will often heal on their own—meaning no surgery and a full return to activities, even when dealing with the…

Posted by Kate Mason in PT eDigest

Take Exercising to Heart

Take Exercising to Heart  Coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, heart surgery and heart attack are all scary words—so scary that they frighten people away from exercising for fear of further damaging the heart. But research shows that a balanced, individualized, supervised exercise program can actually speed recovery from heart surgery and heart attack, and…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

The Recipe to Relieve a Baker Cyst

The Recipe to Relieve a Baker Cyst If you suffer from knee pain, the culprit might be a Baker cyst, an accumulation of joint fluid that creates a bulge at the back of the knee. The bulge is noticeable, and a physician can usually diagnose it accurately by taking a history and feeling for the…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest