Shoulder the Work of a Tuberosity Fracture

At the head of the arm’s humerus bone, where the muscles of the rotator cuff are attached, is a rounded section called the greater tuberosity. A dislocation or a fall on the shoulder can cause the greater tuberosity to fracture, leading to pain when lifting the arm or moving the shoulder, and limiting your range…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

WHAT IS A ROTATOR CUFF?

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles around the shoulder. It is responsible for holding the humerus (upper arm bone) into the socket of the shoulder joint, initiating abduction (lifting arm to side) and rotating arm outwardly. The muscles in the rotator cuff include: • Teres minor • Infraspinatus • Supraspinatus • Subscapularis HOW…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in Healthy Advice

Rotator Cuff Surgery

Question: My surgeon states I need to have rotator cuff surgery on my shoulder. How long will it take before I have good use of my shoulder again? Answer: There are a few factors that play into your recovery time. For example; Patient age, tissue quality surrounding the injured area, rotator tear size, as well as other current medical issues…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in Healthy Advice

Redo for a Rotator Cuff Re-tear

If you have already gone through rotator cuff surgery, the last thing you want to think about is doing it all over again. Unfortunately, many patients do suffer tears of the same tendons that caused them to need surgery in the first place. Most of the time, this is not the surgeon’s fault, nor does it mean that you didn’t…

Posted by STARS Administrators in PT eDigest

Replacing Your Shoulder in Reverse

In conventional shoulder replacement surgery, the surgeon fits a plastic cup into the shoulder socket and attaches a metal ball to the top of the upper arm bone. But for some patients, especially those with muscle damage around the shoulder or large rotator cuff tears who have developed a complex type of shoulder arthritis, conventional…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Keeping the Fat Out of Your Rotator Cuff

Keeping the Fat Out of Your Rotator Cuff For most of us, the idea of “fighting fat” is nothing new. But fat is not just an enemy of your waistline. It’s an enemy of your muscles, too—especially when you are recovering from rotator cuff surgery. When the rotator cuff tendon is torn, a gap between…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Restitching a Torn Rotator Cuff

Restitching a Torn Rotator Cuff Your rotator cuff is a collection of muscles and tendons located where your upper arm meets your shoulder socket. Its primary purpose is to provide structural support to your body so that you can perform a wide range of arm movements, especially ones that involve overhead motion. These include manual…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Shoulder impingement

Q: Can physical therapy improve my shoulder impingement? A: Shoulder impingement syndrome is caused by 3 variables: Bony deformation (bone spurs) A weak rotator cuff musculature Scapular muscle imbalance. Your 4 rotator cuff muscles help keep the ball of your humerus centered in the socket of your shoulder blade. If they become weak, the ball…

Posted by Kate Mason in Healthy Advice