Shoulder Replacement? No sports?

 Shoulder Replacement Does Not Mean Goodbye to Sports Shoulder replacement surgery has dramatically increased over the past few decades, today nearly 53,000 shoulder replacement surgeries are performed annually in the United States. 1. The substantial rise can be attributed to the procedure’s success rate with most patients (as high as 92%) describing their shoulder as “better,” with…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Shoulder Instability and Bracing

 What You Need to Know about Shoulder Instability and Bracing by Lee Diehl, MD The shoulder joint is one of the most mobile joints in the body and as a result is one of the most commonly dislocated. Young athletes participating in football and other contact or collision sports are particularly prone to experiencing a shoulder dislocation. Bracing may help stabilize a shoulder by…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Shoulder the Work of a Tuberosity Fracture

At the head of the arm’s humerus bone, where the muscles of the rotator cuff are attached, is a rounded section called the greater tuberosity. A dislocation or a fall on the shoulder can cause the greater tuberosity to fracture, leading to pain when lifting the arm or moving the shoulder, and limiting your range…

Posted by STARS Admin in PT eDigest

Put Your Shoulder Separation Back Together

The shoulder, with the greatest range of motion of any joint in the body, is also one of the most complicated structures in the body. (The shoulder actually includes four different joints.) Because of the shoulder’s wide range of motion, complications may arise when it can’t move around freely or when the complex system of…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Back in the Swing After Shoulder Replacement

Can you resume playing golf after total shoulder replacement surgery? The answer may well be yes. To replace the shoulder, a ball-and-socket joint, the surgeon inserts a metal prosthesis to replace the “ball” (the end of the humerus) and resurfaces the inside of the “socket” (glenoid cavity) with high-density polyethylene. Any nearby bone spurs are…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Replacing Your Shoulder in Reverse

In conventional shoulder replacement surgery, the surgeon fits a plastic cup into the shoulder socket and attaches a metal ball to the top of the upper arm bone. But for some patients, especially those with muscle damage around the shoulder or large rotator cuff tears who have developed a complex type of shoulder arthritis, conventional…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

When Your Shoulder Goes Snap, Crackle, Pop

Those popping and crackling noises heard when you move your shoulder are normal, most of the time, but should these sounds and sensations be accompanied by pain, swelling and loss of joint function, you may be experiencing degeneration of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. Smooth surfaces of the cartilage that line the shoulder degrade, and the…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Shrugging Off a Shoulder Dislocation

Shrugging Off a Shoulder Dislocation It is a classic movie scene: The hero’s shoulder gets knocked out of joint. With a nonchalant grunt, he pushes it back into place and goes about his business saving the world. Well, that might work in the movies, but in real life a dislocated shoulder is a very serious…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

When Your Shoulder Blade Is “SICK”

When Your Shoulder Blade Is “SICK” Do you have a “SICK” scapula? No, not sick with a fever or a cold, but SICK—an abnormal condition of the shoulder blade. This condition is characterized by Scapular malposition: The scapula has moved to an abnormal position on the rib cage. Inferior medial border prominence: The scapula protrudes abnormally…

Posted by Rebecca Thompson in PT eDigest

Shoulder impingement

Q: Can physical therapy improve my shoulder impingement? A: Shoulder impingement syndrome is caused by 3 variables: Bony deformation (bone spurs) A weak rotator cuff musculature Scapular muscle imbalance. Your 4 rotator cuff muscles help keep the ball of your humerus centered in the socket of your shoulder blade. If they become weak, the ball…

Posted by Kate Mason in Healthy Advice